Restaurant

 

CURRY
Does that sound familiar? Indian cuisine is synonymous with curried preparations. However, the preparation of curry as it pertains to Indian cuisine is totally different from the everyday mention that links it to the curry powder so readily available at the supermarkets. Curry in India is not a dish, but a class of dishes.
The art of Indian cookery lies not in high spicing but in the subtle use of delicate spices to enhance the dormant flavors and subdue the undesirable ones.We have a varied mix of preparations from different regions of India; however, the dominant style is "MUGHLAI" and has its roots in the Mughal era.

TANDOORI & VEGETARIAN

The cuisine of India is as varied as the sub-continent from which it originates. As a first time experience, the variety in taste and flavor is simply overpowering. In fact, a delicately spiced Indian curry can tantalizingly tease your taste buds! The culinary art in India is passed from generation to generation and the recipes have seldom been accurately reproduced in written form. The "gurus" in cooking never divulge their exact methods of preparation. Professional skill inspires a sense of pride and satisfaction in the Chefs and they would not part with it at any price.The use of spices in Indian cookery dates back to time immemorial. It was the lure of these spices that broughtmany foreign traders to the shores of the ancient land of India. Indian cuisine is not necessarily acrid and searing. The art of Indian cookery lies not in the excessive use of spices but in the delicate mix of a variety of spices to enhance the taste and flavor.

There is a popular belief, rampant in the West, that Indian cookery requires the use of special herbs and ingredients and the cooking is done in special utensils by some complicated technique. Special utensils were used but there was another reason for this - different types of food require heat conduction and distribution differently, this dictated the use of brass, copper and iron utensils.